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This Viral Article Claims That the "Instagram Aesthetic" Is Dead

Is this goodbye to our perfectly curated IG feeds?
This Viral Article Claims That the "Instagram Aesthetic" Is Dead
IMAGE INSTAGRAM/marcofantini_mf
Is this goodbye to our perfectly curated IG feeds?

Believe it or not, gone are the days when brightly-colored walls, artsy installations, and perfectly flat-laid food would draw in hundreds of likes for your photos. The Instagram aesthetic is dead—or at least, according to a few analysts. Apparently, with the current trend on the visual-based platform, staged and polished photos that look like they were taken by a professional camera and edited to perfection are starting to gain less and less traction in the past months. 

"A year ago, an influencer could post a shot with manicured hands on a coffee cup and rake in the likes—but now, people will unfollow," observes James Nord, the CEO of  influencer-management platform Fohr. In an interview with The Atlantic, James confirms that at least "60 percent of influencers in his network with more than 100,000 followers are actually losing followers month over month." The gradual drop seemingly proves to show how people are fast growing tired of seeing the same curated, glossy photos on their Instagram feed. 

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In fact, the trend with today’s younger generation of influencers is leaning towards more gritty, candid images of their day-to-day, hoping to show the most authentic version of their lives. Often the look of these supposedly more "genuine" posts are made to resemble the aged quality of vintage film cameras rather than seamless DSLR images. According to The Atlantic’s article, Huji Cam, a phone app that lets you achieve this exact kind of old-timey, nitty-gritty aesthetic, has been downloaded a total of 16 million times by people who presumably are looking to show a more real, less-staged side of themselves without the need for overexposed "Instagram walls."

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"People are just looking for things they can relate to." Lyndsey Eaton, the co-founder of the influencer-marketing agency Estate Five, tells The Atlantic. "The pink wall and avocado toast are just not what people are stopping at anymore."

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