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Here's Why You Should (or Shouldn't) Watch "Kingdom"

Are you ready for Netflix’s first ever zombie K-drama?
Here's Why You Should (or Shouldn't) Watch "Kingdom"
IMAGE Courtesy of Netflix
Are you ready for Netflix’s first ever zombie K-drama?

When Netflix revealed back in November that they’re producing their very first Korean drama, we didn’t really know what to expect. During their See What's Next: Asia event, we were given a preview of this then-secret show starring Ju Ji-Hoon (Along with the Gods), Doona Bae (Sense 8), and Ryu Seung-Ryong. It's a murder-mystery-thriller set during the Joseon era with a zombie outbreak twist. Written by Kim Eun Hee (Signal) and directed by the critically-acclaimed Kim Seong-hun (A Hard Day), this show—now revealed as Kingdom—feels like a true original and an impressive start for Netflix in the K-drama arena. But with the countless zombie-themed movies and TV series coming out recently, is Kingdom really all that revolutionary? Read our spoiler-free review below!

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PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix

The stars of Kingdom:(L-R) Ryu Seung-Ryong, Doona Bae, Ju Ji-Hoon, writer Kim Eun-Hee, and director Kim Seong-Hun
PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix

What I Liked About It

You don’t need to be a K-drama fan to watch and appreciate it.

Kingdom feels and looks like a well-made suspense horror-thriller film that’s been split into a set of one-hour episodes. It just so happens that it’s set in Korea and the actors are Korean, but it doesn’t alienate its audience by sticking to the typical K-drama formula. It provides a great mix of both the Asian and Western approach to the horror genre. It's action-packed and fast-paced, too, leaving you wanting more after every episode. If you’ve never seen a K-drama in your life, then Kingdom would definitely be a good start.

PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix

From the show’s cinematography to production and sound design, Kingdom overflows with quality visuals. A reasonably big budget has clearly been poured into it, and it resulted beautifully on screen. 

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PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix

It’s a fresh and original zombie story.

Zombies are a relatively modern scare, and on-screen they're usually fought with guns or heavier artillery. But set in the early Joseon era, zombies could arguably be an unstoppable foe. There’s more to Kingdom’s undead than their hunger for human brains. The show presents its villains as more than just mindless flesh-eating creatures. Writer Kim Eun Hee mentioned that Kingdom is about hunger of all sorts—be it for food, wealth, love, or power.

Ju Ji-Hoon as the crown prince.
PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix
PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix

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PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix

The theme does transcend to the Joseon aspect of the show with the crown prince played by Ju Ji-Hoon, whose storyline is the heart of the series. As he investigates the origin of the outbreak, it slowly unfolds into a political power-play of sorts. There’s more to just finding a cure in this intricate story.

Doona Bae as nurse Seo-bi.
PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix
PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix

Then there’s Doona Bae who plays Seo-bi, a nurse whose sole purpose and drive is to help people. Frail and meek as she might be, she’s no damsel in distress despite being in the center of a zombie outbreak. Along with the crown prince and his guard, the three will form a competent and interesting team to solve the mystery behind the rise of the undead. This is more than just a hack-and-slash gore-fest of a show like The Walking Dead. Think Game of Thrones meets Train to Busan. There is as much politics as there is horror in Kingdom, and it’s just so new to see those two themes intertwine on screen. 

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There’s surprisingly a bit of humor, too.

The funny sidekick: Kim Sang Ho as the prince's loyal guard.
PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix
PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix

When you watch serious horror films or series, you don’t expect to get any laughs from it. In contrast,  Kingdom finds the right balance with the comedic and innocent friendship between the crown prince and his loyal guard played by Kim Sang Ho. Ji-Hoon and Sang Ho’s chemistry and banter are one of the highlights of the show, giving the audience a much-needed break and some laughs in between all the action and suspense.

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It's not a cheap thrill.

PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix
Seo-bi tries to unlock the mystery behind the dead turning back to life.
PHOTO BY Courtesy of Netflix

There are no characters whose stupid choices will frustrate you in Kingdom; only foolish yet forgivable decisions made out of ignorance, given that it's set in a time period with zero knowledge on zombies and how to fight them with guns. It’s also a slow burn kind of horror that focuses more on the mystery of the plague rather than just simple violence against undead creatures. Sure, there are jump-scares (a lot of them actually), but I wouldn't say they deserve all the credit for being an enjoyable series. 

What I Didn’t Like About It

The first season only has six episodes! Although the second season has already been confirmed, trust us, Kingdom will leave you wanting more.

So Should You Watch It?

Admittedly, I’m not a horror fan, but there’s more to Kingdom than just being a scare fest. There’s no other show quite like it out there that merges the politics of a historical drama with an all-out zombie apocalypse. This show received a lot of hype, and it deserves it. We're calling it: It’s going to be your new favorite Netflix show.

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